World Fighter

Classic beat ’em up action. You must guide the planet and defeat the evil planets to save the universe!

Videos

Post Mortem

World Fighter, The Cosmic Warrior was my thirteenth game developed for the main 48 hour Ludum Dare game development competition.

Dylan, Joe, and myself got together at Panera on the Friday night before the competition for a Ludum Dare kickoff.  We speculated about what the theme would be.  In previous competitions, we could get an idea of what the final contenders would be based on voting in previous rounds.  However, those metrics are no longer available, so it was anyone’s guess.

My previous two games that I had developed over the past month were both collectible games.  Note Chomper was a 2.5D Pac-Man clone that I developed for the MiniLD #73.  Miner Madness was a platformer that I developed in GameMaker for GM48 where you avoid the bats and collect the gems.  I knew I wanted to develop something for this competition where you attack and blow things up.


One of the themes that caught my interest was “A Small World”.  As with some of my previous entries, such as One Gunman, I knew I could take the theme and make it the protagonist of the game.  I told our group that I was thinking that I could make a fighting game, with a character like Globey from Pee-Wee’s Playhouse as the main character.  He would fight other planets across the universe.

My original idea was a fighting game similar to Street Fighter II.  The title is a play on “Street Fighter, The World Warrior”.  At first, I thought about just switching the words “street” and “world”, but “The Street Warrior” really didn’t fit when I decided that the environment would be space, so I decided to go with “The Cosmic Warrior”.  I had never made a beat ’em up game, so I decided to make the game similar to classic arcade games like Final Fight or Double Dragon.

For the player’s character, I decided to make it green with blue for the facial features and hair.  I tried adding a nose to my character by modifying the mesh in Blender, but then it really didn’t look like planet so I kept the original sphere shape.  I think Joe was the one who suggested using moons for punching, which I think turned out well.  I modeled the planet character and animated the moon punching in Blender.  I tried keeping the planet and two moons as separate objects in Blender, but that caused problems when importing into Unity, so I combined the three meshes into one, with three bones in the armature.  I created an idle animation and a punching animation.  I assigned one capsule collider to the planet character, and then a sphere collider to the moon used for punching.  Unfortunately, this means that the moon “fist” collider has to be reassigned whenever the model is re-imported into Unity.  I haven’t found a good way around this yet.

The enemies are similar to the player’s character, except they have a different texture.  I tried making them look like Mars, with white hair to look like the northern ice cap of Mars.  I made it so that each enemy could be destroyed with one hit.  I had planned on having multiple enemies with varying levels of health, so that some would be more difficult to defeat than others.  I also hoped to have a boss planet character, that would need to be defeated in order to clear the level.  I ended up just having a counter for the total number of enemies and the player just needs to defeat all of the enemies to clear the level.  I also wanted to have life bars displayed for each of the enemies, but time ran out before I could add that feature.

The movements of the player and enemies were handled with Playmaker addon for Unity.  The enemies continually check to see if the player is a certain distance away.  Once the player is close enough, then the enemy will move to the player’s location.  When the enemy reaches the player’s location, it will start attacking.  After each attack, it will check to see if the player is still in range, and move toward the player again if the player has moved away.  Both the player and enemies bob up and down, which I think turned out well.  It gives a bit of liveliness to the characters.  I had to manually write the turning code myself, since the default rotation was not always in the direction that I wanted.  I always wanted the player to rotate with the front facing towards the camera, so I had to take that into consideration in my rotation code.

I used the Blender Cell Fracture plugin again for making the planets explode.  I put the explosion animation in a separate prefab.  When an enemy is defeated, the enemy GameObject is destroyed, then an enemy explosion prefab is instantiated which plays the death sound effect along with playing the cell fracture animation.  The one problem I still have with the Cell Fracture plugin is that you can’t define what the inner parts of the exploded object look like, so it just appears to be random parts of the texture.  There are lots of options for the plugin, so I probably just need to look into it some more.

I used Audacity again for the sound effects.  I didn’t try anything really experimental this time.  I used the pitch modification to lower my voice and added a little bit of an echo.  I used an envelope for the punch swipe sound.  The one thing that I find frustrating with Audacity is that I think it should make the folder of the file that you opened the default when saving or exporting the modified file, because it wastes a lot of time having to dig through the directory tree to find your sound effect folder each time.  However, it is a free tool so I can’t complain.  The Audacity source code is also on GitHub, so I could actually change this if I really wanted.

The music was composed in GarageBand on my MacBook Pro, as I have done in previous competitions.  Again, I used my regular process of making a couple of melodies, then I changed up the instruments and made slight modifications and mixed the melodies together.  I also made a slower version with fewer instruments for the title screen.

I made the starfield background using a tutorial that I found years ago when making my Earthball pinball game.  I changed it up a bit to suit my needs.  I left out the supernova stars to create a skybox background.  I learned that the skybox settings are hidden in the Window Lighting settings, and it is specific per scene.  I had to change the Environment Lighting Source to a solid color, since the starfield skybox source made everything too dark.  I put two stars down as a guide on the ground texture for the bounds for where the player can move.

The game world is composed of a number of “blocks”, similar to a street block.  Each block has three enemies, which are somewhat randomly placed.  There are two starport type objects, which I modeled and texture mapped in Blender at the last minute, which also form the bounding area of where the player can move.  I had envisioned that these would be destructible and produce items, similar to the trash cans in Final Fight.  The level could be improved by having an invisible wall that prevents the player from proceeding until all of the enemies on a block are defeated.  I have a case statement that does add an invisible wall before the first block and after the last block to prevent the player from falling off of the ground.

I am happy with the game that I made for this Ludum Dare competition, but I don’t feel like I learned or tried anything new.  There are definitely things that I want to fix and enhance in this game.  However, after three back-to-back game jams I’ve decided to take a break for a little while.  I think I want to try a new game engine or new modeling tool next time.

Ichiban Sokoban

Ichiban Sokoban

Ichiban Sokoban is a sokoban game that I developed in Unity.  Use the robot to push the crates into the goal areas.  Try to finish the levels in the lowest possible number of moves.  If you get stuck, you can reset the level and try again.

Ichiban Sokoban

Developer Log

I developed Ichiban Sokoban for the Mini LD #67, which had the Classic Mashmix theme.  One of the suggested games to remix was Sokoban.  I had developed a sokoban game years ago in Java for a college course.

I started developing the game by creating a simple Board class in C#, which basically just held the textual representation of the game (I changed the chars to ints for simplicity).  When the player presses an arrow key, it updates the Board, not the game world.

I created another class that actually handles instantiating all of the object in the game world.  When the Board object is updated, all of the GameObjects in the scene update their positions according to the board.  None of the GameObjects in the world have colliders.

The game can parse levels in the standard sokoban text format.  I’m hoping to write a file importer so that players can load their own levels.

I’ve been developing Ichiban Sokoban on the nights and weekends for about two weeks now.  I’m really happy with what I have developed.  The game seems to be received well on GameJolt, as it has quite a few downloads for a desktop game and some positive votes.

I got the file importer working, which reads out of the default application directory using the Application.dataPath variable, with “/maps” appended.  I had to write some extra code to verify the the file extension ends in “.txt”, otherwise it will try to read the “.meta” files that Unity adds by default.

For a Windows build, the “maps” folder must be placed  in the IchibanSokoban_Data folder.  For a Mac build, the “maps” folder must be placed in the “IchibanSokoban.app/Contents” folder.  On MacOS, you have to right click the folder and select to show contents.  Otherwise, double clicking the IchibanSokoban.app folder will start the game.  It is a hassle since on both platforms, the “maps” folder must be copied every time the package is built, since it deletes any folders that already exist there.  I should create a script that automatically copies the maps files after a build.

I am also in the process of adding a timer and best move and score values.

Videos

Links and Downloads

Steam Greenlight

Download on Itch.io

Download on GameJolt

Wiki page

Shape Quest

Shape Quest

Shape Quest

Help Mister Square save Shape Land by returning the super spinning power artifacts. Avoid touching all enemies.

Shape Quest Official Videos

Post Mortem

Ludum Dare 35 was my tenth time participating in the full Ludum Dare 48 hour game development competition.  The theme this time was “shapeshift”.  I knew fairly early that I wanted to make a game with controllable shape characters.  My original idea was to have three shapes that you could switch between, and each shape would have a unique ability or power.  I had envisioned having three playable shapes, which were the square, triangle, and circle.  The gameplay was going to be similar to Trine, where the player would need to switch between the three to solve puzzles.

I wanted to take a break from Unity and create a game in some other engine this time.  I had heard a lot about Godot, so I planned to use that engine for this competition.  Godot is a free and open source game engine that is very similar to Unity.  Before the weekend, I worked through some Godot tutorials, so I was able to move a simple sprite around on the screen.  In Godot, instead of GameObjects, it has Nodes which have similar properties such as position, rotation, and scale.  Godot can be used to make either 2D or 3D games.  It has a scripting language that is very similar to Python, where tabs and spaces are significant.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t ever able to fully understand the physics system.  In Unity, physics is fairly simple.  You attach a RigidBody component and one (or more) colliders to your GameObject, and then you are good to go.  In Godot, there are three types of physics objects (KinematicBody, RigidBody, and StaticBody).  Your object has to have a CollisionShape or CollisionPolygon as well, and everything has to be parented correctly under your main object.  It was very confusing, especially with the bounding boxes, and it just never did work correctly for me.

After about four hours into development, I knew I wasn’t going to have the time to successfully make a game in Godot.  Therefore, I fell to my backup plan which was to make a GameMaker game.  I had heard a lot of bad things about how GameMaker handles things like collisions.  Although, I have been impressed with some games that I’ve played recently, such as Crashlands, which was created in GameMaker.

Shape Quest GameMakerFortunately, most of my initial development was creating the vector graphics for the game characters, so switching to GameMaker didn’t sacrifice too much work.  I had worked through some GameMaker tutorials before, but this was my first time creating a full original GameMaker game.  The GameMaker development environment is very similar to Stencyl, which I used to create Dream World for Ludum Dare 30.

All of the graphics were created with Inkscape.  I made a simple tree, which was composed of the union of three circles for the leaves, and a simple path for the trunk.  I created other obstacles such as rocks (rounded gray rectangles) and water (curved blue bezier lines) I created a red square, green circle, and blue triangle characters, which all had two frames of walk animation.  I had originally envisioned the heroes to use an additive color model, while the enemies used a subtractive color model (magenta, yellow, and cyan).  I abandoned that idea, since a yellow circle looked much better like an emoji.  I created a purplish trapezoid as the first enemy.  I also had the idea of making the heroes parallelograms with sides of equal length, while the enemies would have sides of unequal length.

Shape Quest InkscapeWhen I first started designing the movement of the playable character, I used the default GameMaker actions.  The problem with this method, is that the character is stopped whenever one of the movement keys is released.  So the player could be holding two movement keys (such as up and right arrows), but the player would completely stop whenever either of those keys are released.  For instance, the character would expect to keep walking right if the up key was released.  Also, with the default GameMaker movements, the chacter would move when the key was initial pressed, and would pause for a moment before it would continue moving.  This is similar to typing into a text document, when a key is held down.  First it adds the character, then pauses, then repeatedly adds the character multiple times.

To resolve this, I found a tutorial on making a platformer in GameMaker, so I just modified that method to work with a game in overhead view with no jumping.  This method keeps track of a horizontal a vertical movement speed, and the speed values are modified based on which keys are held down.  Now, the movement controls felt much more accurate and responsive.

Now that I had everything necessary to create a level, there needed to be a goal.  I made a simple cyan diamond as a crystal.  To differentiate it from the other world objects, I made it spin and flash between cyan and white.  Adding custom scripts to GameMaker objects is fairly simple, and the GameMaker API is well documented.

The first enemy that I created was the purple trapezoid.  It simply just moves vertically on the screen until it collides with an object, then it reverses direction.  When the player collides with an enemy, the player is returned to the starting position.  If I had more time, I could have added a health meter so the player wouldn’t have to restart after being hit just once.  I gave the enemies angry faces with two frames of animation, which reminded me of the boxer profiles in Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out!!.

The second enemy that I created was the yellow circle, which was modified from my previous green circle hero.  I just had to remove the arms and legs.  The yellow circle just moves in a random direction for two seconds and then changes to a random direction and moves for another two seconds.  This behavior is very easy to create in GameMaker, and I had remembered implementing the behavior in the “Catch the Clown” tutorial that comes bundled with GameMaker.

The third character I created was the green triangle.  I wanted this to be a water dwelling enemy that shoots projectiles at the player.  This behavior is similar to the Zora in the original Legend of Zelda.  If the player stands in one position for too long, then they will be shot, so the player has to keep moving to stay out of the line of fire.  The third level becomes more difficult with four green triangles shooting at the player at once.

The final enemy that I created was the orange pentagon.  Originally, I had made the pentagon cyan, but I thought that would be too confusing with the cyan crystal goal, so I changed the color.  The orange pentagon shoots in four directions at once and randomly changes location after every shot.  These characters are similar to the Wizzrobes in the original Legend of Zelda, except they shoot in four directions.  Their projectiles can be easily avoided, as long as the player doesn’t stand directly horizontal or vertical from one of the orange pentagons.

For the music, I used GarageBand again on my MacBook Pro.  A few weeks ago, I had read an article on Gamasutra about music theory, and to watch the number of steps and skips, so hopefully my music sounds a little better for this game.  I usually try different instruments until I find something that sounds good.  I use the command + left mouse button to add new notes to the piano roll.  I’ve found that it is much easier to modify the lengths and positions of the notes in Piano Roll editor than the Score editor.  I used the C major key, so I just made sure I just stuck with all of the “white keys”.  Overall, I think it took about an hour to create the music.  Like I’ve done with my previous games, the title screen music is just the game music slowed down with some of the instruments modified or dropped.

Shape Quest audioI used BFXR for creating the sound effects when the player is hit or when the crystal is collected.  I used Audacity for touchup work.  I also recorded my voice again for the title screen and game complete screen.  I used Audacity to add a bit of an echo sound.  Unfortunately, my voice sounded a little faint against the background music, and I never found a way in GameMaker to make it louder.

There are many ways the game can be improved.  First, I would like to give the player a method for attacking the enemies.  I would also like to have a way to move from room to room, instead of collecting crystals.  I would also like to have various items, money for purchasing new equipment, and many more enemies.

Finally, I played the game MANY times to ensure that all five levels were completable and also not too easy to finish.  I made both Windows desktop (EXE) and HTML5 (web) builds, and uploaded to Itch.io and GameJolt.  I think the Windows build is the better experience, but I know some people only prefer playing the web version.  It just seems like there is more lag and dropped frames in the web version.

Overall, I was happy with the simple game that I was able to make in GameMaker.  I really appreciate everyone who has played it already.  It already has over 60 votes, which is by far the most votes of any of my Ludum Dare games have received.

Downloads and Links

GameJolt

Itch.io

Ludum Dare entry

Let’s Play Videos